Home Attractions Tours Contact Us About Us

Pembrokeshire

 

From the stunning Pembrokeshire National Park to the tiny boathouse where Dylan Thomas wrote 'Under Milk Wood', West Wales is a delightful region to visit. Enjoy the bustling harbour at Tenby, walk the cliff-paths to the cry of seabirds and visit one of the many castles that still stand on a peninsula sandwiched between Cardigan Bay and Carmarthen Bay.


The Pembrokeshire Coast National Park, one of Britain's breathing spaces, takes in about a third of the county including the entire coastal strip, the upper reaches of the Daugleddau (two swords) and the Preseli's. Its the only National Park that is almost all coastal. The National Park run an extensive programme of activities and events for both adults and children: rockpool safaris, crab catching, bat walks and even time travel! They're all listed in the Coast to Coast newspaper: pick one up when you get here.

The National Trust owns and protects many of the most important sections of the coast especially around Barafundle beach, Marloes, St Davids, Porthgain & Dinas. The trust also runs the superb Colby Woodland Gardens at Amroth and the Tudor Merchants house near the harbour in Tenby.

■Britain's Only Coastal National Park, The Pembrokeshire Coast National Park is the only one of Britain's 14 National Parks to be entirely coastal in nature.
■It covers a third of Pembrokeshire including the Preseli Mountains and the upper reaches of the Daugleddau Estuary.
■Tenby, St Davids, Saundersfoot, Newport and Manorbier are all in the National Park
■So are Skomer, Skokholm, Caldey and Ramsey Islands
■Two inland areas are also in the National Park, The Preseli Mountains and the upper reaches of the Daugleddau Estuary
■The Preseli Mountains are where the Stonehenge bluestones are supposed to have come from.
■The Daugleddau Estuary is known, locally, as the secret waterway


Pembroke Castle

The castle's basic plan is almost rectangular, and consists of a sturdy battlemented curtain wall with niches and powerful corner towers, impressive gatehouse, a complex hall-range, and a huge barn.

 

History

■The Norman knight Odo de Barri was granted the lands of Manorbier, Penally and Begelly in gratitude for his military help in conquering Pembrokeshire after 1003.
■He built an earth and timber fortification, which was gradually replaced with a stone structure.
■His fourth son was Gerald de Barri. Known commonly as Gerald of Wales (the great twelfth century scholar, known as Giraldus Cambrensis) who was born at the castle. Renowned today for his chronicles and descriptions of life in his time.
■The de Barris owned the castle until 1359, after which time ownership changed hands on several occasions, becoming property of the monarchy in the late 15th century.
■By 1630 Queen Elizabeth sold the castle (then considered "ruynous ... quite decayed) to the Bowen family of Trefloyne.
■The Philippses of Picton Castle bought the castle in 1670 who leased it to J.R. Cobb in the late 19th century.
■It was Cobb who undertook much of the restoration work.
■The castle only suffered two minor assaults: the first, in 1327, when Richard de Barri stormed Manorbier to claim what was rightfully his, and, then, in 1645 during the English Civil War, when the castle was seized and slighted by Cromwell's Roundheads.


Features

■Stunning location perched above the beach.
■Well preserved masonry, chapel, round tower and gatehouse.
■Numerous stairs, towers, rooms and battlements to explore.
■Inner ward laid out to gardens.
■Interesting spur tower with good views over the beach.
■Historical displays & life sized figures.


Pembrokeshire offers one of the best outdoor Leisure Centres in Europe where you'll find some of the best environments for a dozen or more adventurous activities, whether it's climbing or kayaking, windsurfing or scuba diving, sailing or surfing. The fantastic scenery is a bonus too!

If you don't have any experience, there are plenty of enthusiastic, qualified instructors who will be more than happy to share their expertise with you. Try a one day taster session or join a group for some more serious tuition. We have some renowned activity centres, especially those offering water sports tuition.

Pembrokeshire has a unique combination of calm, clean, sheltered water in the Milford Haven Waterway and the open ocean. This provides an excellent progression from easy to hard conditions. Perfect for kayaking, sailing, windsurfing and scuba diving.

The principal surfing beaches are Newgale, Whitesands and Freshwater West - Surf at Fresh West is usually the best but beware of cross currents and undertows. You can take surf boards (and bikes) on a new bus service to Freshwater West from Pembroke and surrounding villages like Bosherston or Stackpole.

 

.

 


 



 

PEMBROKESHIRE COAST PATH

The Pembrokeshire Coast Path begins at the village of St Dogmael 's near Cardigan. From here to the enchanting little city of St Davids , the trail passes through some of the wildest and most ruggedly beautiful parts of the National Park. Highlights of this section of the coast path include the Witches' Cauldron, a magnificent rocky bay; the historic little town of Newport with its Norman castle; the picturesque old harbour of Lower Fishguard; the pretty little fishing villages of Porthgain and Abercastle; Carreg Sampson, one of the finest cromlechs in Pembrokeshire; the golden sands of Whitesands Bay, where legend relates St Patrick set sail for Ireland; the little harbour of Porthclais, where St David was baptised; the ruined chapel of St Non's and the little city of St Davids with its glorious medieval cathedral and Bishop's Palace.

From St Davids the trail follows the wide sweep of St Brides Bay with its beautiful beaches to the picturesque village of Little Haven with its narrow lanes cottages, old inns and tiny bay, and then continues around the Marloes and Dale Peninsulas to the busy port of Milford Haven , one of the largest natural harbours in the world. Highlights of this section of the coast path include the superb beach of Newgale Sands; the sheltered bay of Martins Haven, the embarkation point for Skomer and Skokholm islands; Marloes Sands with its multi-coloured cliffs; the little chapel at St Anns Head; the attractive fishing villages of Solva, Marloes and Dale; the gothic folly at Monk Haven; and the impressive Victorian fort at Dale Haven.

The southern section of the coast path from Milford Haven to Amroth takes in some of Pembrokeshire's most beautiful beaches such as those at Freshwater West, Broad Haven South, Barafundle Bay and Freshwater East, as well as some of its most magnificent cliff scenery, such as the spectacular limestone cliffs, stacks and arches of the Castlemartin Peninsula . Pembroke Castle, with its vast keep, which provides commanding views in all directions; the attractive village of Angle, with its historic church, Fishermen's Chapel, dovecote and medieval tower-house; the unique thatched seaweed-drying hut above Little Furzenip; the tiny, ancient chapel built into the rocks at St Govan's Head; the tiny harbour at Stackpole Quay; prehistoric remains including ron Age hill forts and Neolithic Cromlechs; the beautiful lily pools at Bosherton; the great Norman castle at Manorbier; and the ancient walled town of Tenby with its picturesque harbour are just some of the highlights.

 



PEMBROKE CASTLE

Idyllically set on the banks of the river estuary, this mighty fortress is largely intact, and its endless passages, tunnels and stairways are great fun to explore, plus there are super exhibitions, which tell the tale of its medieval life. Once the seat of a succession of major barons who played leading roles in shaping Britain's history, this historic showpiece is the birthplace of Henry Tudor, father to the infamous Henry VIII and grandfather of Elizabeth I.

Spend a day, and picnic in the beautifully kept grounds or from St. Anne's Bastion, enjoy views along the estuary while partaking of refreshments from the snack bar. Visit the Brass Rubbing Centre and quickly and easily, make an attractive souvenir. Complete your visit with a walk around the medieval town walls and millpond, and from the opposite bank of the river, view the castle in all its splendour, surrounded by this peaceful stretch of water.


 


 


 

SELECT AN AREA

Anglesey South East South West Brecon Beacons Pembrokeshire Central North East Mid North North West Coast Llyn snowdonia